Electronic Theatre In-depth Review: Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut

The original Deus Ex: Human Revolution made a significant impact upon its debut, turning many heads by delivering an unexpectedly freeform science-fiction adventure. Fans of the critically acclaimed franchise had of course expected this, but a much wider audience was now embroiled in the story […]
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Electronic Theatre ImageThe original Deus Ex: Human Revolution made a significant impact upon its debut, turning many heads by delivering an unexpectedly freeform science-fiction adventure. Fans of the critically acclaimed franchise had of course expected this, but a much wider audience was now embroiled in the story of the unnecessarily gruff Adam Jensen and the world in which cybernetic eccentricity has been pushed to the limits. Given this success it’s no wonder that Square Enix want to push for a second crack of the whip, but this isn’t your typical ‘game of the year’ repackaging: Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut genuinely improves on the original experience.

Some of the additions are relatively minor, with Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut including all of Deus Ex: Human Revolution’s downloadable content (DLC) packs as part of the core narrative. A well implemented restructure but hardly worth a reinvestment from those who already own Deus Ex: Human Revolution. Instead it’s the brand new features that sell Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut, and to fans of the franchise it’s almost the perfect excuse to revisit Deus Ex: Human Revolution for a second time.

One of Deus Ex: Human Revolution’s biggest features is its augmentations. As the player progresses they can manipulate Jensen’s body through cybernetic implants and patch over weakspots or accentuate strengths. Beginning as an ex-cop now serving as a trigger-happy security guard, Jensen can quickly grow to become a vengeful beast capable of leaping across great distances and smashing through walls with has bare hands. All of this can now be conducted through a simple interface on your second screen (Wii U GamePad, Xbox Smartglass or PlayStation Vita). Furthermore, players can partake in Deus Ex: Human Revolution’s infamous hacking mini-game via touchscreen input and even monitor an area through a hacked security camera on their second screen. This aspect alone is evident of a desire to build on and improve an existing template as opposed to simply repackaging the product in the hope of making a better bottom line.

One of the biggest complaints gamers levelled at the original release of Deus Ex: Human Revolution was that of its boss fights. Often sticking-out like a sore thumb, these encounters frequently demanded that the player break from their established strategy and instead go in all-guns-blazing. These fights have now been extensively redrawn – some more successfully than others – but all now feature alternative strategic options. It’s a clear concession to demand and a favourable remodelling of a weaker part of the videogame, resulting in a much more fluid experience.

Of course, Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut still remains largely the same videogame as it was back in 2011, and with that it suffers many of the same flaws. The visual quality of Deus Ex: Human Revolution wasn’t its biggest selling point two years ago and by today’s standards could only be said to be a little better than average. The voice acting is the same inconsistent mess and the musical score, though the best technical aspect of Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut’s presentation, is far from inspiring.

As a re-release of an existing product Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut goes far further than most. This is no simple repackaging, but it’s also not quite as earth-shattering as the original release strove to become. This is an evolution of an already established videogame, another reason for the most ardent Deus Ex fans to replay Deus Ex: Human Revolution and the final chance to convince newcomers that this a story worth telling. Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut does both of these things with confidence, using modern technology and patching over the cracks of the original release. Deus Ex: Human Revolution – Director’s Cut sets the example for second issues that Electronic Theatre hopes others will follow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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