Accessorise to Survive: Razer Sabertooth

Like the majority of Razer’s accessories, the Sabertooth control pad is sold as a high end device. A quality peripheral stamped with the official ‘Xbox 360 Licensed Product’ mark and is billed as having numerous unique features that will not only improve your gaming abilities […]
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Electronic Theatre ImageLike the majority of Razer’s accessories, the Sabertooth control pad is sold as a high end device. A quality peripheral stamped with the official ‘Xbox 360 Licensed Product’ mark and is billed as having numerous unique features that will not only improve your gaming abilities but also allow you to play at your peak performance for longer. These aren’t throwaway claims, and given the Sabertooth’s price, nor should they be made on a whim.

Of its unique features the most noticeable is undeniably its built-in OLED screen. The reason for this is to display which of the two programmable customisation channels is currently in use. The Sabertooth features six multi-function buttons (four on removable tilt triggers on the rear and two mounted near theElectronic Theatre Image traditional triggers atop the pad) as well as a customisable sensitivity for the analogue sticks. This is a commendable asset, allowing for two players to store their personal preferences or a more demanding gamer adjustable options for different types of videogame. The OLED may be a little over the top, a simple LED could’ve performed the same job with less power consumption, but Razer’s products are typically nothing if not far reaching.

Because of this OLED screen and the backlit face buttons however, the Sabertooth does not provide a battery powered option. Though the device comes with a removable cable (which is made in Razer’s typically high quality braided fibre design) this is simply for storage and transportation purposes. It actually features a screw lock to ensure that the connection doesn’t loosen overtime, thus removing the potential loss of input response.

That being said, the face buttons don’t protrude from the Sabertooth quite as far as that of the official Xbox 360 control pad, and as such it can take some time to become used to the slightly greater force required for the more mechanical buttons presses. The triggers are off a higher quality than many will beElectronic Theatre Image used to and the height of the analogue sticks will be a judgement call: during Electronic Theatre’s time with the Sabertooth some loved them and some hated them.

Arguably the best feature if the Sabertooth is its rubberised grip. Though far from being unique, the feel of the Sabertooth is one of quality and the texture does allow for longer sessions of play without the control pad becoming uncomfortable. So one of Razer’s grand claims is proven, then, but when faced with mostly less preferable parts, a higher build quality simply doesn’t ring true as justification for charging nearly three times the price of the first-party product.

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