Electronic Theatre In-depth Review: The Walking Dead: Season 2: Episode 2: A House Divided

By now every reader of Electronic Theatre should be well aware of how much faith the team has in Telltale Games’ ability to craft a compelling story. The Wolf Among Us has reached some fantastic heights and the second season of The Walking Dead doesn’t […]
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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Electronic Theatre ImageBy now every reader of Electronic Theatre should be well aware of how much faith the team has in Telltale Games’ ability to craft a compelling story. The Wolf Among Us has reached some fantastic heights and the second season of The Walking Dead doesn’t appear to want to deviate from that high acclaim. Here in the second episode, A House Divided, we find a plot that’s able to enthral and surprise in equal measure; why would we want it any other way?

If you’ve come this far in the series than you’ll likely know the mechanics of The Walking Dead rather well by now. A House Divided doesn’t change the established ruleset in any real way until thewalkingdead_s2e2_1the close, and aside from a questionable QTE sequence mid-way through it does well to expand and reduce the character roster as well as maintain the pace of the series thus far. In that final moment however, Telltale Games’ The Walking Dead is forever changed thanks to an uncommon and arguably unwarranted leniency.

The ‘rewind’ option allows played to replay moments of the episode and at first feels cheap; as if Telltale Games weren’t confident of their position. However, when given some thought, it’s obviously a concession to the internet: that vocal minority who would throw their toys out of the pram were a developer to force them to stand by their decisions. Electronic Theatre recommends that you ignore this feature. You maythewalkingdead_s2e2_1 not get the results you hoped for, but that’s merely a reflection of life, as The Walking Dead is intended to be.

The Walking Dead: Season 2: Episode 2: A House Divided is a dramatic turning point, but only because the player is so invested on these characters. The choices you make here genuinely feel as though they are having an impact, and so replaying earlier segments is a disingenuous mechanic. You are Clementine, and you will make mistakes, but it’s not the destination that’s important; it’s the journey you took to get there.

Score: 90%

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