Electronic Theatre In-depth Review: Dragon’s Crown

Along with the PlayStation 3 release of Dragon’s Crown European gamers can now get stuck into the videogame on PlayStation Vita. Aside from a small hitch at launch concerning cross-platform gameplay – an issue that was swiftly dealt with via a downloadable patch – Dragon’s […]
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Electronic Theatre ImageAlong with the PlayStation 3 release of Dragon’s Crown European gamers can now get stuck into the videogame on PlayStation Vita. Aside from a small hitch at launch concerning cross-platform gameplay – an issue that was swiftly dealt with via a downloadable patch – Dragon’s Crown arrives on Sony’s current-generation system on good form. So much so in fact, that it could even be considered superior to its home console sister release.

The core videogame experience is shared between formats – this in itself is nigh-on essential to allow for the cross-platform data share – with the action being just as immediate here on the handheld as it was on the big screen. The player Electronic Theatre Imagebegins by creating a character by choosing from the six classes available, their general outfit colour and then entering a series of personal messages to be delivered at specific points in the gameplay, such as upon their death. The touchscreen can be used to input much of this information and can also be used to command the on-screen cursor during gameplay, though you can of course use the right analog stick for this latter task if you so wish, just as in the PlayStation 3 version of the videogame.

A basic tutorial teaches the player the fundamentals of the videogame though it’s not long before they are left to their own devices, able to invest in skills and items and progress their character however they see fit, alone or with friends. This involves taking on missions, searching new areas and uncovering treasure. Doing so will level up your character, give you access to new equipment and finance to trade with. You’d Electronic Theatre Imagebe forgiven for thinking that Dragon’s Crown sounds much like any other modern scrolling beat-‘em-up with role-playing game (RPG) elements at this point, as frankly when taken at it’s most basic level it is. However it’s the added finesse that makes Dragon’s Crown something worthy of your attention.

The combat system is distinctly varied for each of the six classes, mixing close combat, ranged, magic and air attacks into a repertoire deep enough to maintain interest for several hours. Couple this with the fact that the enemy selection frequently tasks you with mixing-up your strategies and improvising against new attacks and defence patterns. As the player gains experience and thusly progresses through Electronic Theatre Imagethe level system their statistics will upgrade automatically, but it also makes available new weapons which more often than not the player will already own.

In addition to the level-up system players can build a selection of adventurers to take into battle with them. Finding bones within the level will allow you to resurrect fallen adventurers who you can then choose to fill your party with when human colleagues are unavailable. These adventurers will fight by your side without question, gaining additional reward for yourself while improving their own skills, but should they fall in battle they are gone forever.

The visual quality of Dragon’s Crown is simply stunning. The crisp high-resolution drawings look stunning on the PlayStation Vita’s diminutive screen and the animation is of the same quality of its PlayStation 3 sister release. The sound quality is also quite high, with the narration being impressive throughout. The online issues that occurred at the launch of the Electronic Theatre Imagevideogame have now been fixed, and as a result the technical quality of the videogame is of the standard you would expect from a cross-platform PlayStation title in the modern era.

A hugely enjoyable scrolling beat-‘em-up with role-playing game (RPG) elements, Dragon’s Crown sets the standard for the genre on the PlayStation Vita and it’s a high benchmark for the competition to reach. Remarkably, Dragon’s Crown plays the same videogame on PlayStation Vita as it does on PlayStation 3, however the visual design is even more impressive as it was clearly designed for the high density display of Sony’s high-tech handheld. Buying the videogame on both formats is a questionable investment, but if you’ve not yet bought it for PlayStation 3 you most certainly should pick it up for PlayStation Vita.

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