Electronic Theatre In-depth Review: DmC: Devil May Cry – Vergil’s Downfall

The first story expansion for the critically acclaimed DmC: Devil May Cry casts the player in the role of Vergil, our smart-mouthed hero Dante’s brother. The wisest of the pair, Vergil isn’t without his own fare share of aggression and agility, nor is he without […]
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Electronic Theatre ImageThe first story expansion for the critically acclaimed DmC: Devil May Cry casts the player in the role of Vergil, our smart-mouthed hero Dante’s brother. The wisest of the pair, Vergil isn’t without his own fare share of aggression and agility, nor is he without a cause. Vergil’s Downfall puts this new hero in the leading role, and teaches us a lesson in just what betrayal means.

Vergil’s Downfall continues from the events that concluded DmC: Devil May Cry, and as such the state that Vergil is in and his location probably won’t make much sense to those yet to finish the original storyline. Thankfully, those who have since moved on to other titles will find that, while Vergil’s Downfall isn’t exactly forgiving in terms of it’s combat and platform challenges, it does kindly give players the option to play the opening section with tutorials for either just Vergil or the gameplay mechanics as a whole.

Vergil’s Downfall makes no hesitation in throwing you back into the action at the deep end. ‘A is jump, OK? Good. Now kill these five bad guys.’ And of course, fans of the series wouldn’t have it any other way. Vergil’s abilities feel more solid that Dante’s – less fluid motion and more certain impact – and of course further manoeuvres open up slowly as you progress through the downloadable content (DLC) package. The Angel Mode is the first renovation to be unlocked, and of course Vergil’s Downfall uses the same upgrade system as the core DmC: Devil May Cry videogame, so players are afforded a degree of preference in the evolution of Vergil’s fighting style just as they were with Dante.

Sadly, the opening hour of Vergil’s Downfall wants to rely far too heavily on flying enemies for its challenge rather than allowing players to explore the fantastic combat system which it has inherited. It’s a shame that such cheap tricks are on the agenda early on, as with a small amount of progression Vergil’s Downfall opens up and becomes just as engrossing as the original DmC: Devil May Cry. Ninja Theory rarely stepped over the mark with the balancing of combat challenges in the original campaign, but here in Vergil’s Downfall it would appear that the difficulty on delivering content that balances experienced players and those who have taken a month long break has resulted in some ill-informed decision making.

Vergil’s Downfall is frequently too reliant on repeating waves of enemies in a single location – something with DmC: Devil May Cry managed to avoid for most of its much lengthier duration – but thankfully it’s not all hand-me-downs. A couple of new enemies and some interesting boss fights make Vergil’s Downfall worth investing time in, but only for those who have already pillaged the full worth of the original DmC: Devil May Cry campaign of course.

The story sequences in Vergil’s Downfall are presented with a very different art style to the core videogame; as opposed to using high resolution versions of the in-game visuals, Vergil’s Downfall opts for a more unique approach. A 2D comic book style using bold contrasting colours and stilted animation. It’s an interesting design decision, and one that keenly promotes the differences between the two brothers; Dante may have a tough, cocky exterior with a soft underbelly, but Vergil is a raging ball of emotion burning under a calm and collected outward appearance. Also the soundtrack is noticeably weaker; whether the original compendium of metal bands were on board for this continuation is not currently known, but if they were it’s clear that their weaker material has been used here.

Vergil’s Downfall is a slightly disappointing addition to DmC: Devil May Cry, but this is simply because the original content is of such a consistently high quality. Vergil’s Downfall feels confused and artificially lengthened because of this, and never quite manages to recreate the dizzy highs of the original release. It still manages to look most of DmC: Devil May Cry’s competitors in the eye with a smile on it’s face, thanks largely to the inherited combat system, but as a standalone piece of software design it’s hardly likely to capture it’s audience in the way that Ninja Theory and Capcom may have been hoping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In-depth Reviews Score Interpretation

-END-

Related Posts: