Electronic Theatre In-depth Review: Worms: The Revolution Collection

Few Xbox LIVE Arcade titles have managed to make the jump from digital store to retail shelf, and those which have are invariably the most popular titles their respective genre has to offer. Trials HD, Bejeweled 2 and From Dust have all made the jump, […]
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Few Xbox LIVE Arcade titles have managed to make the jump from digital store to retail shelf, and those which have are invariably the most popular titles their respective genre has to offer. Trials HD, Bejeweled 2 and From Dust have all made the jump, as well as most of Team17’s digital Xbox 360 titles. The latest is a compilation of two of the most popular Worms titles – a videogame that still stands tall in a genre of it’s own nearly twenty years after it’s debut – released in recent years and all of the downloadable content (DLC) that has been offered for them.

Worms: The Revolution Collection begins with a menu screen asking whether you wish to play Worms Revolution, Worms 2: Armageddon or install any of the available DLC packs (three of which are available for Worms Revolution while all six Worms 2: Armageddon expansions are included, despite the box claim of five). All the DLC packs are included on the disc rather than simply being a link to download from the Xbox LIVE Arcade, and as such players without a broadband connection are still able to experience all of the content included with Worms: The Revolution Collection.

Worm Revolution, as the newest title on offer, is the highlight of Worms: The Revolution Collection. Introducing physics objectives to the mix, Worms Revolution proved itself worthy of the name by way on renovating the formula with running water and vastly improved scenery interaction. It also introduced a class system, with four different types of worm each offering unique abilities. It had been many years since Team17 saw fit to renovate, seemingly content with incremental updates and bringing the popular franchise to every available gaming platform, but Worms Revolution finally changed that, making use of current-generation hardware for more than a simple graphical update.

Sadly, the DLC is exactly that which had previously plagued the franchise for all the wrong reasons: simple expansions. Adding new weapons and single-player missions, none of the three packs could be considered essential purchases but as they are included within Worms: The Revolution Collection as standard, you’re hardly likely to argue. Besides, more than one heavy dose of invention within a year would be too much for the aging formula to handle, surely?

Worms 2: Armageddon is taking things back to basics. This is the traditional Worms formula at its critical best: solid gameplay, variable rulesets, fort matches, silky smooth 2D visuals and oodles of content. The six DLC packs help this latter point immensely by offering heaps of new weapons, Electronic Theatre Imagemaps, themes, voice sets and single-player challenges. Just as with Worms Revolution’s DLC, there’s nothing here which breaks the mould, however the Time Attack Pack does refresh the ruleset in the exact way suggested by its title.

There will be many fans of the franchises out there that own all of the content included in Worms: The Revolution Collection, or at least the two core videogames, and so for them there is no point in purchasing the retail edition. The Achievements and save data cross between both download and disc based releases, so the only benefits offered are the availability on consoles without an internet connection and a cheaper price tag. However, thanks to that latter point, any fan who is yet to sample Worms Revolution should most definitely opt for this release over the digital product.

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